Virgin cuts 90% of its capacity, grounds TigerAir

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Virgin Australia has announced even more drastic cuts to its domestic network. At the same time, it also gave some hints that there may longer-term changes in the wings.

The Cuts

The cuts that Virgin Australia announced will see it operate just 10% of its normal capacity. From midnight March 27 its schedule will become very thin, with services between some cities cut altogether. In fact, it will only serve around half the destinations it does now.

Tiger Air will see itself basically shutdown, offering no services at all.

This, of course, has significant impacts on its people, and aircraft. Virgin will be standing down 8,000 employees, and grounding 125 aircraft.

What’s left?

Virgin Australia says that it will retain at least some capacity on the following

Between Brisbane and

  • Sydney
  • Cairns
  • Melbourne
  • Mackay
  • Perth
  • Rockhampton
  • Townsville

Between Melbourne and

  •  Sydney
  •  Brisbane
  •  Canberra
  •  Perth
  •  Adelaide

Between Sydney and

  • Melbourne
  • Brisbane
  • Gold Coast

Between Perth and

  • Melbourne
  • Brisbane
  • Broome

Other impacts

In the announcement, were some additional changes that will change the group going forward. Paul Scurrah, the CEO of Virgin Australia commented that “we operate today may look different when we get to the other side of this crisis”

This was not just idle talk, some changes were even announced. In particular, it is looking to close its New Zealand cabin crew and pilot base, and Tigerair Australia Melbourne pilot base.

Things bode even less well for Tiger customers is that it will be offering a Virgin Australia travel credit.

It remains to be seen what other changes are afoot, but it would not surprise to see some changes in the product offering from Virgin and Tiger.

 

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About Author

Mark is the founder of FlyStayPoints, and caught the travel bug early in life. He discovered the benefits of travel loyalty programs in 2001, and is always learning how they can make travel better. While work takes him between Perth and Melbourne, he is always plotting his next adventure.